See what we accomplished together in 2016

See what we accomplished together in 2016

Jan 1, 2017

Your contributions have helped our campaigns, research, communications, system change efforts and conservation and advocacy programs gain visibility as a vibrant and potent force for environmental change. Additionally, our collective efforts for this coast have set the stage for future conservation accomplishments. 

Pacific Wild specializes in areas where fresh thinking and innovative approaches are needed.

  1. A HISTORICAL VICTORY FOR THE GREAT BEAR.

    For over a decade, we fought a tenacious No Tankers campaign for the Great Bear. This goal was finally realized when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau officially announced that Enbridge’s Northern Gateway project is dead and a tanker ban will be legislated in the coming year.  Because of the leadership and commitment of countless people that rallied against the project, in particular First Nations from across British Columbia, the Great Bear will never have to deal with an Exxon Valdez-scale oil spill disaster. As of now, the legislation does not affect any current shipping. We will be working to reverse the exemption of large tanker barges such as the Nathan E. Stewart. 

  2. COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE SOLUTION.

    Springtime was marked by a rare and unparalleled resolution on the central coast herring spawning grounds between the Heiltsuk and Kitasoo First Nations and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. The DFO finally capitulated and substantially reduced the industrial herring kill fishery allocation. Pacific Wild was proud to assist the Heiltsuk Nation with the documentation and digital communications surrounding herring conservation. While working to develop a model to achieve the goal of sustainable fisheries, we are thankful to these nations for continuing to put conservation first with an ecosystem-based approach.

  3. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT OVERHAUL.

    It’s going to be a dynamic election year in BC as the primary political parties are now on an opposing record regarding a ban on the trophy hunt of grizzly bears. This is one of many critical issues which will be coming to the forefront in 2017 as we continue to advocate for wildlife management policy changes, including the unethical and cruel wolf cull. 

  4. BIODIVERSITY AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY.

    Canada boasts the longest coastline in the world, yet remains an international embarrassment due to its lack of Marine Protected Areas (MPA’s). Sustainable fisheries, and the conservation of marine species and habitats, from whales to eelgrass, rely on greater local management and implementing an integrated approach to marine conservation across jurisdictions. We will be continuing our efforts in 2017 to ensure an ambitious network of MPA’s are part of the future of the Great Bear Sea. 

  5. VOICES OF SOCIAL CHANGE.

    National and international media outlets continue to rely on our visual assets from the Great Bear. Imagery has played a vital role in our conservation work to bring attention to events of significance, injustice, and environmental catastrophes. Documenting threats such as illegal mines, pollution, unsustainable fisheries, and climate change – in addition to showcasing the beauty and diversity of the coast - remain a cornerstone of our work as we confront environmental and social injustice.

  6. A COMPREHENSIVE PICTURE OF OCEAN NOISE.

    Our Great Bear Sea Hydrophone Network records the sounds of the Great Bear Sea, including the incredible cetaceans that make their living here. Marine populations have experienced dramatic changes over the last two centuries and the consequences of activities, namely unsustainable fisheries, climate change, entanglement, shipping proposals, and other threats, are constantly emerging. This research is an essential component to establishing future MPA’s and a safe haven for whales. 

The heroic efforts of First Nations and other coastal communities, scientists, organizations, and individuals continue to shape the future of one of the most spectacular ecosystems on the planet. 

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