7 Reasons Why Salmon Count

Wild salmon are the lifeblood of the B.C. coast. Here are our top 7 reasons why #SalmonCount from a cultural, economic and environmental standpoint.

1.

SALMON FEED COUNTLESS SPECIES

Few species have been as central to the ecological health in the Pacific Northwest as wild salmon. Their annual migrations are a miracle of nature and every fall hundreds of species including bears, wolves, and eagles gather in estuaries and along rivers to feast on the returning fish and benefit from the marine-rich nutrients they provide.

2.

SALMON ARE KEY ECONOMIC DRIVERS

Wild salmon play a critical role to British Columbia’s economy, are greatly valued in the commercial and sportfishing industries, and to their cultural and dietary importance to Indigenous Nations throughout the province.

3.

ENDANGERED SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALES NEED SALMON

Chinook salmon are very integral in the diet of Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW), being one of the only things that they eat. With only 73 individuals remaining, the fate of these whales – Canada’s most endangered marine mammal – is intrinsically linked to that of Chinook salmon. Many of theChinook populations are endangered while others are listed as threatened. It comes with no surprise that numerous researchers have attributed the main driver of the declining populations of SRKWs to the vanishing Chinook salmon in recent years. ⁣

4.

SALMON KEEP OLD-GROWTH FORESTS HEALTHY

The end of the salmon life cycle brings renewal to the Great Bear Rainforest, delivering an annual pulse of ocean-derived nutrients. Did you know that the trees and plants that grow along the rivers of the Great Bear depend on the deceased salmon distributed by animals and birds along the forest floor. As the salmon decomposes, vital nutrients enter the soil and help ongoing plant growth.

5.

SALMON ARE AT THE CENTRE OF INDIGENOUS CULTURE

The importance of salmon extends beyond food and monetary value. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, salmon, particularly sockeye salmon, have been a central aspect in the worldview and life of Indigenous Peoples. In fact, the name sockeye comes from a bad translation of the word “suk-kegh” from the Halkomelem language (part of the Coast Salish language family) which means red fish. Many Indigenous nations have often been referred to as, “salmon people”. Since time immemorial, Indigenous Peoples have depended on the wild Pacific salmon as an important source of food and for trading. The wild Pacific salmon are deeply embedded in their culture and identity.

6.

SALMON INSPIRE ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION ON ALL FRONTS

Wild salmon are a keystone species impacting ocean, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems in unique and profound ways. In our unified efforts to protect salmon in the Pacific Northwest, other environmental issues are often brought to the forefront of policy discussion such as watershed health, open-net fish farms, mining, logging, and dam building.

7.

WILD SALMON IS A BENEFICIAL MEAL FOR HUMAN HEALTH

Wild salmon, like many species of fish, are some of our world’s last natural foods. When fished responsibly, salmon provide a variety of health benefits through human consumption. They are high in protein, yet low in calories and contain a health-promoting essential fat called omega-3 which helps minimise the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Farmed Atlantic salmon are not nearly as nutritious and are harming our coastal ecosystems through the spread of disease and pollutants.

more #SalmonCount articles

Blind Management, Uncounted Rivers

The very foundation of salmon stewardship requires the annual monitoring of thousands of watersheds in coastal B.C. in order to assess the health and abundance of spawning salmon, yet in the last 15 years, DFO funding for salmon escapement programs has been cut by over 60%.

Read More

Why Are Rivers Left Uncounted?

Despite tens of millions of dollars being allocated for wild salmon conservation in B.C., Canada’s federal government has divested from salmon monitoring projects. If fewer than 10% of B.C.’s salmon runs are actually monitored, how is DFO reliably allocating wild salmon for fisheries and broader ecosystem needs?

Read More

donate today and make a difference for wild salmon

number of salmon supporters

printable activities & educational tools

Pacific Salmon Quick Fact Cards

Pacific Salmon Colouring Book

Pacific Salmon Species Posters

share our campaign for the love of salmon

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email